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I Teach a Woodworking Class on Making a Waterfall Edge Table

John Malecki

I Teach a Woodworking Class on Making a Waterfall Edge Table

My First Woodworking Class on How to Make a Live Edge Table with a Waterfall Edge

Projects
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3
min read
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Aug 23, 2019

If you guys have been following me, my channel, and my social media, you may remember my live waterfall edge table that I made several months back. Thanks to your support, my channel has been more successful than I ever could have imagined and I’ve had the opportunity to fine-tune my skills with you as my audience.

Over time, I have gotten a ton of questions about my projects, processes, and inspiration, which made me think it would be a great idea to start interacting with some of you in a woodworking class. When approached by a local Woodcraft store about teaching a class, I figured this would be the perfect opportunity to get started. This gives others the chance to get their hands dirty and for me to share my craft in a more practical way, which I absolutely love the opportunity to do.

So check it out! Here I teach four of my dudes how to make the waterfall edge table from a live edge slab. Below I’ll not only share the video from the class itself, but some of my videos that highlight the skills in the video so you can essentially take the class yourself.

Skills Highlighted in the Waterfall Edge Table Class:

How to Sharpen a Hand Plane

Back in the older days before planers and router jigs, woodworkers flattened all lumber with the good old fashion hand plan. These planers are super time consuming to use, but for many at-home woodworkers are the only solution. I still use my hand plane for almost all of my projects despite having great machinery, which is why I know it’s really important to teach classes how to sharpen a hand plane. I not only go over this with the guys in my class but also made a quick 5-minute video to break it down for you at home.

How to Make a Bowtie Inlay with a Router

When working with live edges, it’s really important to be prepared to deal with any imperfections with clever solutions. These solutions - like a bowtie inlay - keep the wood from splitting further over time and add a bit of flair to each project. When I made my original waterfall edge table, I used metal bowtie insets but I also made a tutorial on wooden bowtie insets like the ones used in this class. These look great and are super easy to make with a router.

How to Make a Waterfall Edge Table

I made a really awesome full tutorial on making the waterfall edge table the first time around. This project was perfect for a first-time woodworking class because it gives you the chance to try out a bunch of great skills that are practical across nearly all live edge pieces. From milling the slab to making the proper cuts for the waterfall, you can find the full tutorial here.

How to Finish a Live Edge Slab

One of the most important parts of any live edge project is finishing it.  A delicate balance exists in making sure you retain the natural beauty of the wood while working to fix and manage its imperfections. For live-edge tables, I typically tackle the finish with some sanding, filling in gaps with epoxy resin, and my all-time favorite finish Rubio Monocoat. In this video on how to finish a live edge slab, I’ll break down my favorite techniques for finishing any live edge table.


Let me know what you guys think of this video, and leave in the comments where I should host my next woodworking class!


Also, be sure to check out my other live edge slab projects:

Download the Plan

Want to try this build out for yourself? Download the digital plan now for step-by-step instructions, measurements, and a detailed look at how to punch this project in the face.

Projects
|
3
min read
|
Aug 23, 2019
|
Sponsored by
John Malecki

I used to be an offensive lineman in the NFL, Now I run my own furniture business and am completely self taught. In my videos and posts you'll see a variety of wood and metal work as well as some tips and tricks. Enjoy!