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How to Make the Best Cornhole Boards (Super Easy DIY)

John Malecki

How to Make the Best Cornhole Boards (Super Easy DIY)

Looking for the Best Cornhole Boards? Make them Yourself!

Projects
|
7
min read
|
Jul 17, 2016

Of all the woodworking projects I’ve ever taken on, perhaps the most common is making cornhole boards for local restaurants, organizations, or friends and family. I’ve made many a cornhole board in my days as a maker, and I’ve basically got it down to a science that helps me make the best cornhole boards with superior efficiency. If only I could get my cornhole playing skills so finely tuned…

Anyhow. I’ve decided to share with you guys this pretty simple how-to for making the best cornhole boards. While this how-to does have a few steps, the tools and materials you’ll need are easy to come by and these board will last and last through years of backyard or tailgate cornhole tournaments.

Made with a pretty simple design, these cornhole boards are easy to transport and can be decked out with a sports team logo, decal, or anything your heart desires. The secret to making the best cornhole boards? The water-based polyacrylic finish that keeps your boards protected and just slippery enough to sink your bag. So check out how I made these beauties below and try it out for yourself!

Project Overview:

How to Make the Best Cornhole Boards

  1. Cut Down Lumber
  2. Cut Rabbets & Miters
  3. Assemble Frame
  4. Cut Inside Panels
  5. Cut Hole in the Panel
  6. Stain and Decorate Surface
  7. Build & Assemble Legs

What You’ll When Building the Best Cornhole Boards:

Tools

Materials

  • Wood for frame
  • Wood panels
  • Wood glue
  • The stain of your choice
  • Water-based polyacrylic 

How to Make the Best Cornhole Boards: The Step-by-Step

Cut Down Lumber

Begin by cutting down the wood for your frame to size.

Cut Rabbets & Miters

Cut rabbets in your wood pieces with a 1-inch reveal. Next, cut the miters on the edges for a seamless corner assembly on the miter saw.

Assemble Frame

Using quick-drying glue, assemble the frame for your cornhole boards. Check that the frame is square, then reinforce with brad nails. Once done, measure the interior dimensions of the rabbeted slots and the base of the board.

Cut Inside Panels

Using the measurements of the rabbeted slots, cut your inside panels with a track saw.

Cut Hole in the Panel

Place the panels inside the rabbeted slots. On the panels, mark a point 9-inches from the top and 12-inches from the side. This center point is where you’ll be drilling your six-inch corn hole from. Cut out your hole, routing it to a perfect circle and sanding by hand.

Stain and Decorate Surface

Next, it’s time to stain the surface of your board. I started by sanding the edges of my panel and the frame flush with my orbital sander, filling in all nail holes with plastic wood. Then I stained my wood panel and painted the frame. On these cornhole boards, I added vinyl stickers, but you can decorate the surface however you see fit.

Assemble & Build Legs

Once the paint is dry, I glue my wood panel into place and clamp it while drying. I reinforce this with brad nails. Once that is done, I spray water-based polyacrylic onto the boards to protect them and keep them slick.

While that dries, it’s time to build the legs. I start by cutting out the pieces of wood, then marked where they would sit beneath the board. I rounded the top of the leg on the sander and drilled them into place. Finally, I cut the flat edges on the legs and secured them into place with bolts and washers.


And there you have it -- the best cornhole boards you can build with two hands! If you liked this project, check out some of my other backyard builds:

Download the Plan

Want to try this build out for yourself? Download the digital plan now for step-by-step instructions, measurements, and a detailed look at how to punch this project in the face.

Projects
|
7
min read
|
Jul 17, 2016
|
Sponsored by
John Malecki

I used to be an offensive lineman in the NFL, Now I run my own furniture business and am completely self taught. In my videos and posts you'll see a variety of wood and metal work as well as some tips and tricks. Enjoy!